It’s pleasing to me that some of my readers are asking questions about First-Aid/Trauma kits specifically for their dogs.  Their are a number of ways to build a kit, or buy one complete.  Both ways will cost between $25 and $500.00, depending on your needs and ability.  Fortunately, most will need to spend under $50.00, to be well equipped, and prepared for anything short of major trauma.

I AM NOW GOING TO PUBLISHED A LIST FOR YOUR CANINE FIRST-AID KIT.  THIS DOES NOT REPLACE YOUR VETERINARIAN IN ANY WAY, SHAPE OR FORM.  CANINE FIRST-RESPONSE IS DESIGNED TO GET YOUR DOG TO THE VETERINARIAN ALIVE AND REASONABLY CALM.  NOT REPLACE SUCH CARE.

Important Phone Numbers
Veterinary clinic phone number and directions to the clinic
Emergency clinic phone number and directions
Poison control center phone numbers
Equipment and Supplies
Muzzle
Magnifying glass
Scissors
Tweezers
Nail clippers and metal nail file
Styptic powder or sticks, Kwik Stop, or cornstarch. I recommend  CELOX!!!
Penlight
Nylon slip leash
Eye dropper or oral syringe
Cotton swabs
Cotton balls
Clean towels – cloth and paper
Rectal thermometer
Lubricant such as mineral oil or KY Jelly (without spermicide)  Trust me on this.
Disposable Prophylactic gloves
Syringes of various sizes. W/O needles!
Needle-nose pliers or hemostats
Grease-cutting dish soap
Bitter Apple or other product to discourage licking
Pet carrier
Towel or blanket to use as a stretcher, another to keep your dog warm during transport (some pharmacies and camping outlets carry a thermal blanket)
Cold packs and heat packs (wrap in towel before using)
Stethoscope
Bandaging Materials
Square gauze of various sizes – some sterile.  some should be large-12″ x 12″
Non-stick pads. Steri-strips.
First aid tape/also a roll of Athletic Tape
Bandage rolls – gauze and Vetwrap
Band-Aids (for humans)
Nutritional Support
Rehydrating solution such as Gatorade or Pedialyte
Nutritional supplement such as Nutri-Cal, Vitacal, or Nutristat
High sugar source: Karo syrup
Medicines*
Wound disinfectant such as Betadine or Nolvasan.  Saline water.
Triple antibiotic ointment for skin
Antibiotic ophthalmic ointment for eyes, e.g., Terramycin
Eye wash solution
Sterile saline
Antidiarrheal medicine such as Pet Pectate
Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for allergic reactions (obtain dose from your veterinarian)
Cortisone spray or cream, such as Itch Stop
Ear cleaning solution
Hydrogen peroxide (used to make a dog vomit – only use as directed by a veterinarian)
Activated charcoal to absorb ingested poisons (consult your veterinarian before using)
*Watch the expiration dates on any medication, and replace as needed.

You do not need to buy this list in it’s entirety all at once.  BUILD your kit starting with items that STOP BLEEDING.  Gauze, pads, saline water, and a coagulant such as Celox, described here. http://www.elitek9.com/Celox-8-x-8-Gauze/productinfo/F051/ .   And even more info. can be found here.  http://celoxmedical.com/wherebuy_veterinary.htm.

Education is the most important part of your Kit.  And confidence in your ability to help, and not PANICKING.  I’ll address that next.

Here is an outstanding kit that is available from Elite-K-9.  $99.00 can bring you alot of peace of mind….Next post will cover EDUCATION for YOU!

Advertisements
Comments
  1. It’s actually pretty impressive how much of this stuff we have on hand just because Smokey is both a clutz and prone to sickness. The few things we have that aren’t necessarily “trauma”, like but we tend to use a lot are: a laxative (dairy can cause constipation and Smokey loves him his cheese), Gas-X for bloat like symptoms (which actually is an emergency situation) and vasaline or chapstick without menthol or any of the other crap they put in chapstick these days for chapped noses, especially in the dry heat in your house to dry cold outside times (like right now) 🙂 We have saved a FORTUNE in vet bills from having these things around the house. We used to take Smokey to the vet for everything only to get prescribed something like Pepcid AC which you can buy in any grocery store. Fortunately, we have a good enough relationship with our vet where we can just call her and she will tell us what medicine to pull out of our first aid kit or tell us to bring him in if we don’t have what we need or she can’t diagnose it over the phone. Great post Robert! You reminded me to go check some of Smokey’s meds and think about investing in an anti-clotting agent. We have a quick-clot for people at home, like the kind they use in the military. Would that work for a dog?